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The Programmer’s Oath by Robert C. Martin (Clean Coder Blog, 2015-11-18)

In order to defend and preserve the honor of the profession of computer programmers,
I Promise that, to the best of my ability and judgement:

I will not produce harmful code.

The code that I produce will always be my best work. I will not knowingly allow code that is defective either in behavior or structure to accumulate.

I will produce, with each release, a quick, sure, and repeatable proof that every element of the code works as it should.

I will make frequent, small, releases so that I do not impede the progress of others.

I will fearlessly and relentlessly improve my creations at every opportunity. I will never degrade them.

I will do all that I can to keep the productivity of myself, and others, as high as possible. I will do nothing that decreases that productivity.

I will continuously ensure that others can cover for me, and that I can cover for them.

I will produce estimates that are honest both in magnitude and precision. I will not make promises without certainty.

I will never stop learning and improving my craft.

It’s shameful to admit it, but I have known that these are the ethics I should live by, but I often let deadlines, expectations, and laziness come in the way. I hope to work in the next few months to uphold this oath. The hardest part is my tendency to people-please, and my low threshold for the “boring” parts of software development — writing tests, and peer reviews.

I know that logically there are no shortcuts; writing bad code to get a product out ASAP ultimately causes more frustrations and time wasted by myself and others. It is hard for me to fully digest that I will have to slow down in order to save time, but I have seen it happen, literally every day on the job, that fixing a problem in hastily developed code ultimately takes much longer than getting it right the first time.
Just got to remember to breathe every now and then.

I stumbled on this when trying to run the new version of STS (Eclipse) on my work computer, which currently does not have Administrative Rights, yet has Windows 10 “Smart Screen” set to prevent running “unrecognized” applications.

If you try to run an application and the Smart Screen is preventing it from running, right click on the application, click Sent to Compressed File (.zip), then Extract the file and run it. Because Windows Smart Screen sees that you created the .zip file, it will assume that you can trust the contents when you extract it. Replace the original file with this file, and you are off to the races.

YMMV, do not do this at home, or on a computer that you are trusted to protect, etc.

Creating a custom CRM 2011 button that performs JavaScript functions can be tedious in CRM 2011.  Most guides that I found on the internet for CRM 2011 still included the antiquated crmForm.all method, which is unsupported.

So far the best method I have found of adding a button, or multiple buttons, to a form created in Dynamics CRM UR12 and possibly higher, is by utilizing an HTML Web resource that will store a generic button and the JavaScript required to change the functionality/text/etc. Borrowed and adapted from Ray and Razvan on the CRM Development forums

The code for the HTML Web Resource (let’s just call it WebResource_ButtonHTML):

<HTML xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"><HEAD><TITLE></TITLE>
<SCRIPT type=text/javascript src="ClientGlobalContext.js.aspx"></SCRIPT>
<SCRIPT type=text/javascript>
    function setText(text) {
        if (text === undefined) {
            text = decodeURI(location.search).replace("?data=", "").replace('%3a', ':').replace('[br]', '<br>');
        }
        var msg = document.getElementById('crmButton');
        msg.value = text;
    }
    //Set the text for the button & attach event
    function initializeButton(text, clickEvent) {
        if (text !== undefined) {
            document.getElementById('crmButton').value = text;
        }
        if (clickEvent !== undefined) {
            try {
                document.getElementById('crmButton').attachEvent("onclick", clickEvent); //Legacy IE code
                    }
    }

    function enable() {
        document.getElementById('crmButton').disabled = false;
    }

    function disable() {
        document.getElementById('crmButton').disabled = true;
    }
</SCRIPT>
<META charset=utf-8></HEAD>
<BODY style="BORDER-BOTTOM: 0px; BORDER-LEFT: 0px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(246,248,250); MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; FONT-FAMILY: Segoe UI, Tahoma, Arial; COLOR: #3b3b3b; FONT-SIZE: 11px; BORDER-TOP: 0px; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; BORDER-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px" onload=setText(); contentEditable=true>
    <BUTTON style="WIDTH: 100%; HEIGHT: 100%" id="crmButton">CRM Button</BUTTON>
</BODY></HTML>

Go into the development page for your form, and then insert this HTML Web Resource and call it ButtonName.  Note that this HTML web resource has code that is normally not supported by CRM 2011 (using the native DOM), but this is okay since this HTML web resource is being used directly and does not have to go through the XRM.Page model.

Now that we have the button that will be inserted onto the frame, we can add custom code in our form’s Javascript library to be able to access the new_ButtonHTML for each button and modify accordingly:

function GetWebResource(name)
{
    try
    {
        var wrt = Xrm.Page.getControl("WebResource_" + name );//automatically adds WebResource_
        if ( wrt != null )
        {
            if ( wrt.getObject().contentWindow.window != undefined )
            {
                return wrt.getObject().contentWindow.window;
            }
            else
            {
                return null;
            }
        }
        else
            return null;
    }
    catch ( e )
    {
        //debugger;
        alert("Error encountered(GetWebResource): " + e.message);
    }
}
var btnName = GetWebResource("ButtonName"); 
if (typeof btnName.initializeButton !== "undefined") {
btnName.initializeButton("Do Stuff", functionToRun); 
}
function functionToRun() {
btnName.disable();
}

The preceding JavaScript defined a function that will check if the web resource has loaded (GetWebResource(“ButtonName”)) and, if the function initializeButton is not undefined, then it will run it and assign it a text value and an event.

Note that with CRM UR12 to UR14 you may have problems with the load order, where initializeButton will sporadically not be defined. If this is the case, you might want to consider setting a timeout to check that the new_ButtonHTML web resource has loaded in the form. That would probably look like this:

function initBtns()  //creating a function so that it can be easily referenced in a timer
{
var btnName = GetWebResource("ButtonName"); 
if (typeof btnName.initializeButton !== "undefined") {
btnName.initializeButton("Do Stuff", functionToRun); 
} else {
setTimeout(initBtns,100); //sets a timeout to run the initBtns function every 100ms
}
}

With these functions, you should be able to reuse the HTML web resource new_ButtonHTML and simply use custom JavaScript to modify them. Make sure that when you add the buttons that you allow the defaults (aside from formatting) such as allowing cross-side scripting or it may not work properly. The page is essentially an iframe or inline frame, hence the GetWebResource function. You might also be able to use other Javascript functions to access the iframe and run the JavaScript for each instance of your new_ButtonHTML.